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Lavandin

Lavandin is the name for a variety of lavender that derives from a cross between English and spike lavender. Commonly grown in France, it dates from the 1820s. A specific cultivar of Lavadin known as ‘Abrialii,’ ‘Abrial’ or ‘Abrialis’ formed the basis of the French lavender industry from 1935 to the 1970s. However, this variety was susceptible to disease from a pathogenic microorganism. The disease cut the plant life from around eight to ten years to three or four. In 1972 ‘Abrialii’ was replaced by ‘Grosso'. Since 1975 ‘Grosso’ has been the dominant cultivar. Also in use today is the variety ‘Super,’ discovered in Alpine foothills.

In the 1920s, the lavender grown in France was about 90% self-sown seed, and the crop was small (it yielded a mere 1 to 2 tons of oil). Today France grows Lavadin in large amounts (28,000 acres yielding 936 to 1,102 tons). Most of this oil is used to scent detergents and soaps. A perfumist would describe Lavandin in general as fruity, fatty, harsh, turpentinelike, eucalyptus fresh, camphoraceous, sweet, aromatic, and possessing a warm wood smell. The plants make great landscaping and produce high quality oil. All lavandins are much less susceptible to the fungus that can ravage the English lavenders. Here in the U. S. ‘Grosso’ has become the favored aroma for soaps, room fresheners, candles, and culinary use. It has a harsh, turpenic note and is more pungent than another popular lavandin known as ‘Provence.'

source: The Lavender Garden by Robert Kourik


 


Varieties

What we currently grow:

Grosso

Super

Other varieties we used to grow:

Alba

Grappenhall

Hidcote Giant

Lavandin

Provence

Twickel Purple

Seal

Sweet

 

 

 

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